The tension between London and Moscow over the death row soldiers


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London tries to exchange Aiden Aslin and Sean Pinner with a prisoner swap, while Moscow expects Boris Johnson’s popularity to decline when he is executed.

Aiden Aslin (left), Shaun Pinner (center) and Sadun Brahim (right) in the trial.
Aiden Aslin (left), Shaun Pinner (center) and Sadun Brahim (right) in the trial.Reuters
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Death sentence for two British soldiers captured in Mariupol Aiden Aslin You sean pinnerhas increased tensions between London and Moscow. Conservative MP Robert Jenrick called the summary test “a major violation of international law” and accused Vladimir Putin of “Use soldiers as hostages”,

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has expressed his “great concern” about the incidents. The foreign secretary, Liz Truss, has denounced the trial “without any legitimacy”, guaranteed support for families and held talks with the Ukrainian foreign minister, Dmitro Kuleba, to try it this Friday. Involve two British soldiers in the prisoner of war swap,

Truss described the death penalty for Aislin and Pinner as “a blatant violation of the Geneva Convention”. The head of the Foreign Office has assured that troops are being held “by representatives of Russia” and “reiterated the United Kingdom’s support for Ukraine.” Putin’s brutal attack,

“The Russian Federation is using foreign troops as hostages to pressure the West into the negotiation process,” warned Vadim Denisenko, adviser to Ukraine’s Interior Ministry. Kingdom, European Union and United States of America.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov declined to comment on the affairs of the two British soldiers. Lavrov has argued that the responsibility does not lie with Moscow, but with the People’s Republic of Donetsk, Ukrainian territory occupied by Russian forces where he has been sentenced to death.

On Russian state television, meanwhile, Putin’s senior campaigner, Vladimir Solovyov, is engaged in a debate over whether British soldiers should be shot or hanged. Soloviev predicted that Boris Johnson’s popularity will fall further When British soldiers are killed.

Aiden Aslin y Shaun Pinner han sido Death sentence in the middle of this week, along with Moroccan citizen Sadun Brahim, as “mercenaries” were involved in acts of “terrorism”. British officials maintain that both Aslin and Pinar were in Ukraine before the Russian invasion, held dual citizenship and joined the Ukrainian Army (36th Marine Brigade) with full force, unlike the international “volunteers” who arrived in the country. Were. in the last four months.

Aslin, 28, from Newark, has worked in the care sector in the UK and joined Kurdish defense units during the Syrian war in 2015, settling with his Ukrainian girlfriend in the town of Mykolaiv in 2018. Pinner, 48, a British Army veteran, has also fought with the Syrian Democratic Forces before marrying in Ukraine, which he considers his “adopted country”.

Conservative MPs Robert Jenrick and Richard Fuller have meanwhile visited the families of the soldiers. The two asked ‘Premier’ Boris Johnson to call Russian Ambassador to London Andrey Kaelin for diplomatic pressure.

“We are facing a humiliating situation,” assures Jenrick.It’s not about mercenaries, They are British nationals who were living in Ukraine before Vladimir Putin’s invasion due to personal circumstances. They were enlisted to serve in the Ukrainian army, were captured and were to be treated as prisoners of war, meaning they should be treated properly and returned to Ukraine as soon as possible “

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